Science

Science

Science is an almost infinitely broad subject area, covering our knowledge and understanding of the universe and literally everything in it. Every student has their own “wow” moment waiting to happen and, in the science department, we aspire to find the unique potential in each of them and bring it to life in our labs. Science is not only fascinating to study – understanding the key ideas in biology, chemistry and physics allows you to appreciate how the world, and everything in it, works and interacts.

We work to grow and nourish aspiration in our students, and encourage a logical and scientific approach to thinking that applies both in and out of the lab. Learning the essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science helps students to appreciate how the complex and varied phenomena of the natural world can be described in terms of a small number of key ideas. Curriculum time is dedicated to explicitly developing scientific thinking skills, through the teaching of subject knowledge; “thinking like a scientist” involves problem solving, prediction, accurate observation and common sense – all skills that are highly transferable to many situations and subjects.

KS3 Science

Year 7

Particle model & Matter

Cells and respiration

Light and sound

Atoms, elements and compounds

Plants

Forces

Year 8

Chemical reactions

Humans (organ systems)

Energy

Earth, Atmosphere and Space

Inheritance 

Electricity

Year 9

Ecology

Chemistry Fundamentals

Energy

Cells, structure and transport

Earth’s resources (part 1)

Earth’s resources (part 2)

Particle model

Diseases

 

KS4 Science

Year 9 is a blended KS3/KS4 curriculum where students cover some of the more challenging KS3 content which will also be assessed in the GCSE and develop their knowledge further with some small sections of KS4 science. This content will be constantly reviewed throughout year 10 and 11.

At KS4 the students have the option of studying combined science where they will achieve one overall grade worth 2 GCSE's or separate sciences (also known as triple science) where they will achieve three GCSE grades one each in biology, chemistry and physics.  At triple there is more content within each topic and physics has one extra unit on space. 

Student's practical skills continue to be developed throughout KS4 to prepare them for the 'required practicals' that are assessed in the written exams.

Combined Science and Triple Science

Year 10

AUTUMN TERM

Biology: 
Infection and response
Chemistry: Bonding
Physics: Waves


SPRING TERM

Biology:
Animal organisation
Chemistry: Energy changes
Physics: Electricity


SUMMER TERM

Biology:
Plant organisation
Chemistry: Acids, bases and electrolysis
Physics: Atomic structure

Year 11

Biology: Homeostasis and response
Chemistry: Earth's atmosphere
Physics: Forces and motion

Biology: Inheritance, variation and evolution
Chemistry: Rate & equilibrium
Physics: Magnetism and electromagnetism
Space (triple only)

Revision

Combined Science GCSE

Examination Board: 

AQA Trilogy

Assessment: 

100% Examination 

There are six papers each 1 hour 15 minutes in length, out of a total of 70 marks and contributing 16.7% of the total double GCSE award:

- Biology paper 1               - Chemistry paper 1                - Physics paper 1

- Biology paper 2               - Chemistry paper 2                - Physics paper 2

The final award is one grade out of a possible 17 (see image) worth two GCSE’s.

e.g.      4-4 translates into two GCSE’s each at a grade 4

            5-5 translates into two GCSE’s each at a grade 5

5-4 translates into two GCSE’s at a grade halfway between a 4 and 5 not one GCSE at a grade 4 and one grade at a 5.

There are 21 required practical’s that the students will carry out which feature heavily in the exams. Students should understand the methodology behind these as well be able to analyse data graphically, draw conclusions and evaluate the methodology and results.

What Will You Learn? 

In your GCSE science course you will build on the knowledge and skills you have developed during KS3. You will already have met some of the foundations of the GCSE material in year 9 as part of our KS3/KS4 blended year 9 curriculum. Year 10 and 11 content allows you to more fully understand the science behind why different processes occur and why science is important in your everyday life. 

During lessons you will have opportunities to evaluate the personal, social, economic and environmental implications of scientific developments in the real world, learn to think critically about the many science reports we see in the media, and to make decisions based on the evaluation of evidence. 

The GCSE course encourages you to develop your knowledge and understanding through practical work (not just those that centre around the required practicals) as understanding the scientific methodology is key to securing a top grade. There is also a large emphasis on the use of maths skills in this science curriculum (up to 30% in some papers), and this is supported by activities in lessons that focus on graphing and calculation techniques. 

Subject

Underpinning concept

Topics studied

Biology

Cellular structure and survival of organisms.

Cell biology, organisation, infection and response, bioenergetics, homeostasis and response, inheritance, variation and evolution and ecology 

Chemistry

Atomic structure of substances leads to different chemical and physical properties and uses.

Atomic structure and the periodic table, bonding, structure and the properties of matter, quantitative chemistry, chemical changes, energy changes, the rate and extent of chemical change, organic chemistry, chemical analysis, chemistry of the atmosphere 

Physics

Transfer of energy from one form to another through different processes.

Energy, electricity, particle model of matter, atomic structure, forces, waves, magnetism and electromagnetism  

What Happens When You Finish? (Career Pathways) 

GCSE Combined Science prepares students well for a range of post‐16 Science courses, including science A Levels in biology, chemistry or physics. 

Studying Science beyond GCSE gives you access to a wide variety of career opportunities, both in science industries and in scientific research. Potential career areas include medicine, dentistry, physiotherapy, chemical engineering, forensics, environmental science, food sciences, genetics, pharmaceuticals, biochemistry, biotechnology, engineering, biomedicine, astronomy, electronics, environmental health, meteorology, nursing and education. 

Science graduates are extremely attractive to employers in non‐science fields too, because of their high levels of analytical skill, excellent problem solving and decision making. 

If you do not intend to study science beyond GCSE, you will still find that college entry requirements for most A Level courses include a good qualification in a science GCSE. Other non‐science college and training courses usually expect you to have a science qualification along with English and maths. 

So, whatever your career plans – or if you are still undecided where your future lies – your Key Stage 4 Science qualifications are important in securing your next steps after GCSE. 

Triple Science

GCSE 

Examination Board: 

AQA biology, chemistry and physics

Assessment: 

100% Examination 

Triple science awards students with three individual GCSE’s graded from 1-9 in Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

For each science there are two papers each 1 hour 45 minutes in length, out of a total of 100 marks and contributing to 50% of the total GCSE award:

- Biology paper 1                           - Chemistry paper 1                            - Physics paper 1

- Biology paper 2                           - Chemistry paper 2                            - Physics paper 2

There are between 8 and 10 required practical’s that the students will carry out for each subject which feature heavily in the exams. Students should understand the methodology behind these as well be able to analyse data graphically, draw conclusions and evaluate the methodology and results.

 

What Will You Learn? 

The topics stay the same in the triple science course as the combined science course. However, not only will you learn the combined science course content in more in depth but you will also be exposed to a wider range of scientific ideas within the topics. The physics triple science course has one extra topic of space which is not covered in any capacity in combined science.

Triple science is an ideal course for those students who are enthusiastic and passionate about science with strong maths skills and would suit those students considering taking science at A level and beyond. The course covers some content that is found at the start of the A level sciences and so offers students the opportunity to meet content a little earlier than usual and begin building the foundations needed for A Level science.

 

Subject

Underpinning concept

Topics studied

Biology

Cellular structure and survival of organisms.

Cell biology, organisation, infection and response, bioenergetics, homeostasis and response, inheritance, variation and evolution and ecology 

Chemistry

Atomic structure of substances leads to different chemical and physical properties and uses.

Atomic structure and the periodic table, bonding, structure and the properties of matter, quantitative chemistry, chemical changes, energy changes, the rate and extent of chemical change, organic chemistry, chemical analysis, chemistry of the atmosphere 

Physics

Transfer of energy from one form to another through different processes.

Energy, electricity, particle model of matter, atomic structure, forces, waves, magnetism and electromagnetism  and space*

 

What Happens When You Finish? (Career Pathways) 

GCSE triple science prepares students well for a range of post‐16 Science courses, particularly science A Levels in biology, chemistry or physics. 

Many students who wish to study science beyond GCSE opt to take triple science at GCSE though this is not a prerequisite for accessing post-16 science courses.  A level sciences provide access to a wide variety of career opportunities, both in science industries and in scientific research. Potential career areas include medicine, dentistry, physiotherapy, chemical engineering, forensics, environmental science, food sciences, genetics, pharmaceuticals, biochemistry, biotechnology, engineering, biomedicine, astronomy, electronics, environmental health, meteorology, nursing and education. 

Science graduates are extremely attractive to employers in non‐science fields too, because of their high levels of analytical skill, excellent problem solving and decision making. 

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