Humanities - History, Geography, RE and PHSCE

Humanities

Humanities Vision Statement –

The humanities and languages department at Heyford Park School aims to develop our students into global citizens who have an understanding of the world around them encompassing where we are, how we got here and how and why the world is a diverse and varied place to live.  In Key Stage 3, students will have the opportunity to study the core humanities subjects of History, Geography, RE and PSHCE. 

Within lessons, students will develop key thinking skills such as evaluation, analysis and justification.  Lessons will encourage curiosity, collaboration, and creativity in order to promote, an enjoyment of learning both in and out of the classroom.  Students will have the opportunity to complete a variety of creative tasks as part of ‘takeaway homework’ tasks during Key Stage 3.

Over time, students will be equipped to develop a good understanding of the wider world around them and become well-rounded ‘global citizens’.

KS3 Curriculum

RE

Year 7

Term 1.1

Ultimate Questions

 

Term 1.2

Christianity 

Term 2.1

Charity

 

Term 2.2

Judaism 

Term 3.1

Faith and Science

 

Term 3.2

Sikhism

Year 8

Term 1.1

Good and Evil

 

Term 1.2

Hinduism

Term 2.1

Prejudice and discrimination

 

Term 2.2

Islam

Term 3.1

Crime

 

Term 3.2

Buddhism

Year 9

Term 1.1

Christian Beliefs 

 

Term 1.2

Christian Beliefs and Practices

Term 2.1

Christian Practices

 

Term 2.2

Religion, peace and conflict

Term 3.1

Religion, peace and conflict

 

Term 3.2

Family and relationships

Religious Studies GCSE

Examination Board:

AQA

Assessment:

100% Examination at the end of Year 11.

What will you learn?

The GCSE course is made up of two components -

Component One (50%):

Is the study of the teachings and practices of the following two world religions; Buddhism and Christianity:

Students will be taught that Buddhism and Christianity are two of the diverse religious traditions and beliefs in Great Britain today.  Students will study the beliefs, teachings and practices of both Buddhism and Christianity and their basis in Buddhist and Christian sources of wisdom and authority. They will study scripture and/or sacred texts. Students will study the influence of the beliefs, teachings and practices studied on individuals, communities and societies.  They will also study common and divergent views within Buddhism and Christianity in the way beliefs and teachings are understood and expressed

Component Two (50%):

Is the study of at least four of the following religious, philosophical and ethical studies themes:

  • Theme A: Relationships and families - Students will study contrasting beliefs on the role of the family and relationships with a focus on the following three issues with reference to the main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and one or more other religious traditions: Contraception, Sexual relationships before marriage and Homosexual relationships.
  • Theme B: Religion and life - Students will study the origins of the universe, including: religious teachings about the origins of the universe, and different interpretations of these, the relationship between scientific views, such as the Big Bang theory, and religious views.  The value of the world and the duty of human beings to protect it, including religious teaching about stewardship, dominion, responsibility, awe and wonder.  The use and abuse of the environment, including the use of natural resources, pollution. The use and abuse of animals, including: animal experimentation, the use of animals for food. The origins and value of human life: The origins of life, including:  religious teachings about the origins of human life, and different interpretations of these, the relationship between scientific views, such as evolution, and religious views.  The concepts of sanctity of life and the quality of life and beliefs about death and an afterlife, and their impact on beliefs about the value of human life.
  • Theme C: The existence of God and revelation – Students will study the philosophical arguments for and against the existence of God, the nature of the divine and revelation.  They will study contrasting beliefs on the following three issues with reference to the main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and non-religious beliefs such as atheism and humanism:  Visions, Miracles and nature as general revelation.
  • Theme D: Religion, Peace and Conflict – Students will study contrasting beliefs on the following three issues with reference to the main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and one or more other religious traditions:  Violence, weapons of mass destruction and Pacifism.
  • Theme E: Religion, Crime and Punishment – Students will study, religion, crime and the causes of crime, religion and punishment and will discuss differing religious ideas on: Corporal punishment, the Death penalty and ‘Forgiveness’.

Who is this course for?

Students who choose Religious Studies are often inquisitive people who are interested in the views and ideas of others. They like asking questions and want to understand why people have the views that they do, why different people react to things differently, and why we do not all have the same beliefs about things, both past, present and for the future.

Students also enjoy lively debates and are able to offer opinions on the reasons why people have different views, what those views are, and why even people with the same faith do not agree on things.

Students who choose Religious Studies will like the challenge of putting together well-balanced arguments in extended pieces of writing and accepting the idea that there is not a ‘correct’ view or belief on any topic.

What happens when you finish? (Career Pathway)

Religion is embedded in our daily lives and studying types of religion can help you understand many types of differences that are visible all around you. Studying religion increases your understanding of global complexity and offers an awareness of different attitudes and opinions.  To study religion is to delve into how religion interacts with some of the different attitudes and beliefs of our world and will help to develop a well-balanced and rounded approach to the world around us.

Knowledge of different views and world religious beliefs can be useful in many jobs where you are working with the public or communities. These include counselling and social services, marketing, sales and advertising, catering and hospitality, leisure, sport and tourism, retail sales and customer services, education and training, medicine and nursing, and service sector roles.

The skills that students learn through Religious Studies are varied and help to develop not only a sense of self and confidence in their own views, but also empathy and understanding for the views of those around you.

 

Geography

Year 7

Term 1.1

Europe

 

Term 1.2

Asia

Term 2.1

South America

 

Term 2.2

Africa

Term 3.1

Oceania

 

Term 3.2

North America

Year 8

Term 1.1

Extreme Weather

 

Term 1.2

Rainforests

Term 2.1

Deserts

 

Term 2.2

Cold Environments

Term 3.1

Hazardous Landscapes

 

Term 3.2

Oceans

Year 9

Term 1.1

Sustainability

 

Term 1.2

Development

Term 2.1

Global Superpowers

 

Term 2.2

Globalisation

Term 3.1

Tourism

 

Term 3.2

Global Issues

Geography

GCSE

Examination Board:

AQA (Specification A)

Assessment:

100% Examination

Paper 1: Living with the Physical Environment (35% of GCSE)

Paper 2: Challenges with the Human Environment (35% of GCSE)

Paper 3: Geographical Skills (30% of GCSE)

 

What will you learn?

Geography is both up‐to‐date and relevant. It is a subject that helps us to make sense of the world around us. Many of the world's current problems boil down to geography, and we need the geographers of the future to help us understand and deal with them.

Geography is a stepping stone to the skills and understanding that will help you succeed in a whole variety of careers. It will also provide you with an insight into a wide variety of important and topical issues that affect us and our planet and give you the opportunity to see our world in a different way.

The course is split as follows:

Living with the Physical Environment

The Challenge of Natural hazards The Living World

Physical Landscapes in the UK (Rivers and Coasts)

Challenges with the Human Environment

Urban issues and Challenges The Changing Economic World

The Challenge of Resource Management

Geographical Skills

Issue Evaluation

Fieldwork

Physical Geographical Enquiry Human Geographical Enquiry

 

Who is this course for?

You have enjoyed elements of Geography so far in KS3 You enjoy learning about both local and global issues You wish to develop the following skills:

  • Communication and report writing
  • Team working and decision making
  • Leadership and management
  • Research and time management
  • Problem solving and independent thinking
  • Statistical and numerical skills
  • Map reading and interpretation

What happens when you finish? (Career Pathway)

Geography allows you to develop a wide range of skills and knowledge and is highly regarded by employers and educational establishments. It is also an excellent choice at this stage of your education as it ties together elements of many other subjects (including Science, Maths, History and English) which will help keep your options open for any future educational or career choices.

Some of the careers that see a geography qualification as being an advantage are:

  • Urban planner
  • Environmental or coastal engineer
  • Volcanologist
  • Conservation officer
  • National Park officer/ranger
  • Architect
  • Environmental health
  • Estate agent
  • Census data analyst Travel Agent
  • Meteorologist
  • Environmental law
  • Military

History

Year 7

Term 1.1

  1. Life in England after the Romans - the Norman Conquest.
  2. The Norman Conquest and how the Normans maintained control of England.

 

Term 1.2

England during the Middle Ages: Control and everyday life

 

 

Term 2.1

  1. Wars of the Roses and the Tudors
  2. Succession of the Stuarts

 

Term 2.2

  1. Succession of the Stuarts and England under Cromwell.
  2. Restoration of superstitions
  3. Reasons for the French Revolution

 

Term 3.1

France after the Revolution, the Terror and Napoleon

 

Term 3.2

 'Empire', which countries started building empires and why?  Spanish colonisation of South America and the growth of piracy from 16th to 18th centuries

 

Year 8

Term 1.1

Industrial Revolution in Britain and the development of the British Empire

 

Term 1.2

USA: 1740-1890 - Independence and American West

Term 2.1

Slavery, Civil Rights and the end of the British Empire

 

Term 2.2

Who was to blame for the Titanic disaster?

Term 3.1 & 3.2

Year 9Medicine through time -

Prehistory to modern day

Year 9

Term 1.1

World War One

 

Term 1.2

Conflict in Northern Ireland

 

Term 2.1

  1. Conflict in Northern Ireland cont.
  2. Inter-War USA: 1920-41

 

Term 2.2

WW2 and the Holocaust

Term 3.1 & 3.2

The Cold War - Including society in UK and USA

History KS4

GCSE

Examination Board:

Edexcel

Assessment:

100% Examination

 

What will you learn?

 

Your GCSE will include the study of the following topics:                                                                                               

Warfare and British society, c1250-present and London and the Second World War, 1939-45. (examined in Y11)

From the knights, archers and infantry of Medieval England to the modern weapons and army of today. How has warfare changed, and what factors and individuals made this possible?   In addition, you will study in depth the issues facing the British government and people during their daily lives in Second World War London, you will look at the impact of the nightly bombing raids on the people of London and the measures they took such as evacuation and ‘Dig for Victory’ in order to keep Britain going during the war, you will also look at government initiatives and use of propaganda as the war progressed.  If you enjoy looking at wars and weaponry as they develop over time, and how societies change due to war, then this is the course for you!

 

Superpower relations and the Cold War, 1941-1991 (examined in Y11) - In this unit students will study the changing relationship between the USA and the Soviet Union at the end of the Second World War.  They will look at why relations soured between the two superpowers and look at the ways in which these two sides ‘fought’ each other without actually fighting each other.  Finally, they will look at the end of the ‘Cold War’ and the impact that it still has today.

You will see just how close the world came to nuclear war on more than one occasion!

 

Early Elizabethan England 1558-1588 (examined in Y11) - This British depth study allows students to investigate key features of life during the Early Elizabethan era.  We will study the issues faced by Elizabeth during her reign, how she dealt with unpopularity, religious issues and continuous threats from foreign powers, including the Spanish Armada.  We will also study what life was life for the different groups in society who lived in England during this time.  You will see why it was dangerous to be unemployed and homeless during Elizabeth’s reign.

Weimar and Nazi Germany 1918-1939 (examined in Y11) - This final topic allows students to gain an understanding of the major events that occurred in Germany between the two wars.  We will study the issues faced by the post-war government and the economic, political and social problems that ordinary Germans faced during the 1920s.  We will then look at the rise of the Nazi Party and look at how and why Hitler was able to become a dictator in 1934.  Finally, we will look at what life was like for ordinary Germans during the Nazi regime and what they did to the groups that did not ‘fit’ into the ‘Third Reich’.

 

Who is this course for?

Students who choose History are often inquisitive people. They like asking questions and want to understand why events happened, what effects people or events had and why our world looks the way it does today.

Students also enjoy lively debates and are able to offer opinions on the significance of events or people.

Students who choose History also often enjoy literacy and like the challenge of putting together well-balanced arguments in extended pieces of writing.

What happens when you finish? (Career Pathway)

History is a well‐regarded subject by colleges, universities and employers. It is acknowledged as a challenging GCSE and as such, is one of the subjects that the top universities in the UK recommend students study.

Apart from being very interesting, History is also very useful. Employers who see you have a GCSE in History know certain things about you. They will know that you have taken on certain key skills which, learnt through history, can be applied to all sorts of other situations. They know that:

  • You are able to gather, read and understand different kinds of information.
  • You are able to produce balanced arguments; weigh up the pros and cons of situations.
  • You are aware of differing interpretations of key events and can weigh up the strengths and limitations of an argument.
  • You are able to communicate clearly and have learned how to express yourself verbally on paper.
  • You can understand how people tick, and what motivates them, what they think and feel.

 

PHSCE

Year 7

Term 1.1 

Health and Wellbeing- Intro to PSHE, Self Confidence, Social media, Resilience

Term 1.2

Living in the wider world- Organisation, skills, targets, Careers

Term 2.1

Relationships - Positive relationships, Values, Trust

Term 2.2

Living in the wider world- Financial, Money, morals

Term 3.1

Health and Wellbeing- Drugs, alcohol, puberty, consent 

Term 3.2

Relationships- Bullying, online safety, support 

Year 8

Term 1.1 

Health and Wellbeing- Emotions, mental and emotional health, Coping strategies, physical activity, 

Term 1.2

Living in the wider world- Employment, Careers, Social media

Term 2.1

Relationships - Diversity, Gender, Teamwork 

Term 2.2

Living in the wider world- Employment Rights, Emotions, Opportunities. 

Term 3.1

Health and Wellbeing- Drugbs, alcohol, Sexual health, Roles and Responsibility, Risks.

Term 3.2

Relationships- Stereotypes, discrimination, Prejudice

Year 9

Term 1.1 

Health and Wellbeing- Life balance, Physical activity,, balanced diet, personal health.

Term 1.2

Living in the wider world- Online safety, Viewpoints/ opinions

Term 2.1

Relationships - Marriage, change in relationships

Term 2.2

Living in the wider world- GCSE options, Employment, Careers, Goals

Term 3.1

Health and Wellbeing- Pressure, Drugs, alcohol, First aid

Term 3.2

Relationships- Contraception, Inclusion, Discrimnation

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